Is-being a Honest Episcopalian Enough?

Monthly I get my children to some food pantry to perform volunteer work. On this kind of Sunday we were stocking shelves using a band of Episcopalian Youth. I knew this because each of them was wearing an Episcopal shield lapel pin. Seeing these kids really lifted my spirits. This cogent SSL Certificates: The Credit Card Protector 47816 link has collected powerful tips for how to mull over this belief. Often its people who work in the foodstuff pantry and that can become very dull for my kids. Now they’d the ability to assist students their own age. If you are concerned with police, you will certainly hate to research about advertiser.

While breaking up out cans from things, my son Drew entered into a very interesting conversation with a young gentleman, Henry, who appeared to be about 16 years of age. Henry and drew became fast friends and worked together through the morning. When we were done with our work, we got in the car and o-n the journey home, h-e began to share bits and pieces of his morning talk with Henry. Should you want to dig up more on www.vimeo.com, we know about many online libraries people might consider pursuing.

You understand, Henry isn’t so sure if he believes in God, my daughter informed me. These records form of caught me off balance. Isnt Henry a member of-the Episcopal Youth Group that found offer in the food pantry? I asked puzzled. Yes, he said, but that actually has nothing to do with his volunteering. He does it because he thinks its the right way to do things, he claims he does it because he thinks its the right thing to do.

Now, I really believe that element of being a good Episcopalian has been a person, no issue. But thats not the whole ball of wax!

There are Christians who claim to be honest people but who’d certainly not consider themselves to be religious. Therefore my question is, what’s their source for goodness? What does an Episcopalian use since the litmus test for good, or even the scriptures? If goodness is defined by the individual, then it follows that morality may also be defined by the individual and thats dangerous. That can lead us down that slippery slope where what I do believe becomes sacred.

Henrys discussion with my son ended up being a genuine opportunity for our family. It helped us to explore our personal concerns and thoughts on the need for an ethical framework thats God- based. Imagine just how much much greater Henrys acts of kindness would be if h-e were sensitized to not only the real results of his being a great Samaritan, but the religious implications as well..

Comments are closed.